Archive for the ‘idtheft’ Category

Pinpoint Credit Card Fraud App for Cell phones needed?

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

The Fear of Fraud has been taken one step further with the introduction of Pinpoint. Pinpoint Fraud’s website shows a video of them scaring you into thinking someone could be using your debit card somewhere without you knowing it. The Piinpoint service is there to monitor your purchases and your location of your cell phone at all times then they analyze it and text you if they see something suspicious.

What PinPoint is not telling you when they want you to sign-up with them and pay $6.95 a month is that your credit card company already provides this. Chase, for example will call you if you have made purchases in other states or made too many large purchases. The card companies look at your geographic location but they do not need you to slow down your cell phone with an app to do this.

Another reason PinPoint is not worth your time is because when you purchase something online it will not be in the location of where you are. This is because online businesses may have their processing center far from their store address or it could be with a company like Paypal that is not exacly local.

Most of these add-on credit card or debit fraud detections are worthless and a hassle you do not need. Even though the PinPoint service is Free with just one card it is not worth your time.

Mint.com Security Breach or Email Error?

Friday, October 15th, 2010

We have been receiving for the last few days blank emails from Mint.com, which is strange because we only signed up for one of their notifications when we get bank fees. We wondered why some spammer was sending us Mint.com blank emails with no links. Was it Mint.com sending these by mistake, had they been breached, or has a virus somehow effected the site? After this happened more than once we really started wondering and then finally tonight we received an email from Mint.com responding to the strange blank emails.

Mint.com, a company recently bought by Quicken responded with the following statement:

A flood of emails were recently sent from
stage-mini@mint.com to some Mint users.
It was a misconfiguration with our email provider causing blank emails to go out.

This was not a security breach and no data was
compromised. We are putting measures in place to ensure this never happens again.

We apologize for the inconvenience it may have caused you.

Sincerely,
The Mint Team

Everything seems to be fine in our Mint.com account and hopefully nothing is really tampered with by some bad employees. It just goes to show the scare that goes on when we give out data to a website and using apps on an iPhone or a Blackberry and then turn around and either worry or feel safe that they will take care of our information. The bottom line is to be cautious of any data you give sites and the passwords.

Worried about stolen laptop data?

Sunday, August 10th, 2008

This new company called Gadget Trak can help you if you are a small business owner who stores private information on a laptop or if you keep lots of personal banking and credit data of your own on a laptop or phone.  I first saw this reported on a local news station of how this got some laptop thieves arrested when the Gadget Trak service tracked the IP address of the victim’s laptop and turned on the web cam taking a video and pictures of thieves.

If you are worried of storing information on your computer because it could get stolen by id thieves this is one more step to take.  We seem to live in the day of big brother where we have to track our own devices just to make sure our own money does not get stolen from right under us.  Then again you have to decide which is best for you — tracking of your laptop or the security of knowing your id is that much more protected.

The best thing to do when your laptop or device such as an Iphone is stolen is to make sure the data is destroyed. Data such as password information and notes you have on your computer could really hurt your identity.

More information on this gadget tracker can be found here.  Read more on id theft and the hassles we face on this blog.

Get $20 added to your account scam

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

Normally I am not fooled by email scams because of past mistakes, viruses (trojans), and spyware problems.  I have been a victim of password theft to my important email account and lost it for a several earth shattering hours.  Sometimes making a few mistakes helps prevent us from a major theft of our hard earned money.

Today I almost fell prey again to an email that made it through my spam mail to my inbox.  It was asking for a survey that only takes two minutes and I would get twenty bucks added to my bank account at Capital One.  I just happened to have a Capital One bank account so I thought this was legit until I looked over the URL.

Some surveys redirect to third party sites so that is common but the fact that it redirected to a Verizon site that looked to be someones personal site I became weiry.  The URL for a Capital One survey went to a Mysite.Verizon.net.  That seems strange and I would advise anyone stay far away from even clicking on this link.

Dear Customer ,

The Capital One Bank Online department kindly asks you to take part in our quick and easy 5 questions survey. In return we will credit $20.00 to your account – Just for your time!

With the information collected we can decide to direct a number of changes to improve and expand our services. The information you provide us is all non-sensitive and anonymous – No part of it is handed down to any third party.

It will be stored in our secure database for maximum 7 days while we process the results of this nationwide survey. We kindly ask you to spare two minutes of your time and take part in our online survey.

I also noticed something else “phishy” about this email.  The copyright line at the bottom said members instead of member.

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A. and Capital One, N.A., members FDIC.

One more thing noticeable about this email scam is the FROM.  It says capitalsurvey@securenet.com instead of the URL that the link points to.  I would suggest not only looking over the URL that the emails link to before filling out any personal credit information by mousing over the link (not clicking on the link).  Also, check out the reply-to and from email headers.

Lending Tree to Announce Stolen Data?

Friday, April 25th, 2008

Just as I am trying to log-in to my Paypal account that says it may have had some fraudulent activity and going through a zillion steps to put out that fire I read an email with some breaking news.  The article states that a ex employee of the loan company and a current company could have stolen live lead information and sold those leads to other mortgage companies.  I assume to make some money on the side.

The mortgage industry is already in enough hot water and this will just make it worse for companies such as CountryWide, LendingTree, and LowerMyBills. You can expect some big laws to come down harsh on the mortgage industry and extensive employee evaluations when hiring.

If Lending Tree does make this announcement it will be a big issue.  Another reminder that you should regularly obtain a credit report to see who could be selling your identity behind your back.  It is sad that you cannot trust some sites even with a privacy policy such as Lending Tree because their employees could be selling your Social Security Number and private information in the background.

I assume that the problem could be worse if you go in person to apply for a loan since your papers are sitting out for anyone to see going through different offices and filing systems.  I am still a believer in doing things online securely and safely and this will blow over in time.